EPS by the numbers: Total staffing

EPS by the numbers: Total staffing
(2006-07 data)

(based on 06-07 enrollment of 132,338 K-8 & 61,648 HS pupils) under EPS ratio actually employed surplus
Teachers 11,894  16,826 4,932
Teaching assistants 1,570 6,544 4,974
Administrators 630 1,659 1,029
Clerical staff 970 2,371 1,401
Media assistants, nurses, counseling, guidance, librarians, instructional coordinators, student and support staff 1,498 9,385 7,887
Total: 16,562 36,785 20,223

***

Source for EPS ratios:
Essential Programs and Services: The Basis for a New Approach for Funding Maine’s Public Schools, David L. Silvernail & Weston L. Bonney, Maine Policy Review, Winter 2001
Source for student and staff numbers:
Public Elementary and Secondary School Student Enrollment and Staff From the Common Core of Data: School Year 2006–07, NCES

EPS Ratios

I found them in this report:
Essential Programs and Services: The Basis for a New Approach for Funding Maine’s Public Schools, David L. Silvernail & Weston L. Bonney, Maine Policy Review, Winter 2001

Does anyone have idea of the "ideal" staffing ratios and other ratios such as number of students under EPS? I remember hearing once that it was suggested that here would be one librarian for every 200 students for example. Also how many students per teacher etc. I just wonder how far off the assumptions of EPS in terms of actual classrooms and schools in rural areas are.
Thanks!

EPS ratios

George, that's more or less what the table above shows.  Clearly it also shows the statistical problem of aggregating fractions of staff -- e.g adding six-tenths of a teaching position ten times and concluding that 10 positions can be staffed by six bodies.

Here are the EPS ratios according to the linked EPS report

EPS ratios (pupils per position)  K-8  9-12
 Teachers  17:1  15:1
 Teaching assistants
 100:1  250:1
 Counseling / guidance
 350:1  250:1
 Librarians  800:1  800:1
 Media assistants
 500:1  500:1
 Nurses  800:1  800:1
 Administrators  305:1  315:1
 Clerical staff
 200:1  200:1

 

EPS: Staffing By the Numbers

The EPS formula is supposed to provide a base, not a ceiling, so it's important to remember that "surplus" is a relative term.

Beyond that, there are many underlying fallacies to the EPS formula, but two of the major ones to my way of thinking are:
1. It does not account for art, music, foreign languages, physical education, etc. All of those teachers are "extra".
2. As Brian said, it does not account for the difficulty of filling ".2" or ".8" positions. A half-time librarian allowed under the formula will typically be filled with a full-time person because it's darned hard to find someone to work less.

If you take a look at the ED 279 which your superintendent's office would have received recently, you can see how the ratios play out in your school system.

Also, adding percentages to the above chart makes it more clear how really out of sync the EPS formula is.

Education Commitee on EPS

This coming Monday afternoon, the Education Committee is scheduled to hear about EPS. Here's the item from their schedule:

Monday, February 23, 2009
2:00 p.m. –

MEPRI research plan to evaluate EPS funding formula and GPA distribution under EPS Funding Act

EPS Ratios with Percentages

EPS by the numbers: Total staffing
(2006-07 data)

under EPS ratio actually employed 'surplus' 'surplus' as percent of actual 'surplus' as percent of EPS
Teachers 11,894 16,826 4,932 29.3% 41.5%
Teaching assistants 1,570 6,544 4,974 76.0% 316.8%
Administrators 630 1,659 1,029 62.0% 163.3%
Clerical staff 970 2,371 1,401 59.1% 144.4%
Other* 1,498 9,385 7,887 84.0% 526.5%
Total: 16,562 36,785 20,223 55.0% 122.1%

*Media assistants, nurses, counseling, guidance, librarians, instructional coordinators, student and support staff